Three Days!

Wicked Words Quarterly has now been open for three days, and in those three days visitor numbers to the site has exploded (thank you all 🙂 ), the magazine has received more than 10 submissions a day and the Twitter feed [@MyWickedWords] has started to gain followers…

This is all down to my resolution to visit The Daily Post and start writing, the writing is still happening but the Quarterly seems to have taken on a life of it’s own and I’m learning something new everyday.

The hard part comes now, I’ve set some time apart today to start reading some of the submissions and this is where I have to harden up a bit and write nice acceptance or rejection emails. The acceptance ones aren’t going to be too hard, but the rejection ones will be, right now I can see myself giving personal rejections but if it gets any more popular it may have toe be a form (which I really don’t want to do) with some personal comments.

This is fun, but hard work. I didn’t realise it was going to be such hard work, though when the first issue is done I should have all the tools and skills for the next issues.

So any horror, sci-fi or fantasy stories you want to submit there is still over a month to get them in for the June issue.


Scribophile

After reading the recommendation at The Daily Post in the Need Feedback? Hone Your Blogging with a Workshop post. I decided to join Scribophile.

I initially spent several hours just exploring the different features, forums and aspects of the site.

From my initial overview the site and community seemed really friendly, supportive and constructive. A great place to post your writing and have it honestly critiqued by like-minded people.

So I started out by introducing myself on the forums and favouriting a few people, joining a few groups. This just let me get a better feel of the site.

I then though ‘bugger it’, I had nothing to lose and went to do my first critique!

The system of critiques built into the software at the site are relatively easy to use and help guide you through the complexities of giving a constructive and well-mannered critique. I’ve started by giving critiques to relatively short pieces of flash fiction as that is what I like writing at the moment.

The process was very easy and hassle free, and afterward the people that I critiqued were able to comment on how I had done, nobody seemed to get their knickers in a twist and all saw the critique as what it was meant. A constructive and helpful look from the outside on their writing.

The process of being able to upload your own work is that you have to earn Karma before you can post, this is done by making critiques, easy really 😉

After a few critiques I had earned enough Karma to upload one of my pieces, a drabble, 100 word story with a twist or unexpected conclusion.

Two of the three critiques I received were excellent and even pointed out problems with the tense that I hadn’t noticed even though I had read it several (hundred) times previously, the third critique didn’t understand the drabble form and therefore critiqued it as a short story. What he said was excellent for a different form, but wasn’t applicable to the form I used. I wasn’t worried as it was all meant to help.

Joining in the groups is also a good idea as this is where the more personal form of support can come in and you can get regular small reading group together to mutually critique work and join in together on discussions about writing and the industry.

Overall I’ve really enjoyed my less-than-a week there and have gone for the premium option as I think it really deserves to flourish.


Daily Prompt: Age

Daily Prompt: Age

This photograph was taken in Durham, UK. As I was walking up to get a piece of pizza, the man who worked there got very excited and was exclaiming “I’m going to be famous!” so I obliged and took a few photographs. A couple of weeks later I took a few prints for him, which really tickled him.

Pizza Man

Pizza Man


Peek-a-Boo

Weekly Photo Challenge: Family

Peek-a-Boo

Peek-a-Boo


Writing vs. Blogging

I started off this year with a great deal of enthusiasm, joining in with the daily blogging tasks from The Daily Post, writing every day as I know that writing every day improves writing style, word count and general confidence in the practice of writing.

That was all fine until a few days ago when I realised I wasn’t writing, I was blogging. The subtle difference is that I was writing for a blogging audience in the WordPress community rather than developing my word crafting skills toward the goal of writing poetry and fiction.

This was fun, I did enjoy the biographical aspect of the writing but was finding that it was pushing out the other forms of writing I was wanting to do. To counter this I wrote a really succinct flash-fiction piece (less than 100 words) to remind myself of the components of storytelling.

I enjoyed this more, and want to spend more time doing this rather than chasing my tail to complete the various daily and weekly tasks that the sites set me.

I will still do some of the prompts at the various sites that I visit but will be far more discerning about the prompts I use and how I fulfil them. More of the prompts will be dealt with using fiction and poetry and less will be biographical and soul-searching.

Hopefully this won’t lose me my audience, but I need to do this for my plans of writing 50,000 words of fiction in November, and more as I develop my writing skills.


The Luckiest People

Daily Prompt: The Luckiest People

Who was the first person you encountered today? Write about him or her.

Photographers, artists, poets: show us PEOPLE.

Photographer’s hat on today whilst I set-out my thoughts about writing vs. blogging

Friends

Friends


Polite Company

Polite Company

“It’s never a good idea to discuss religion or politics with people you don’t really know.” Agree or disagree?

I want to say disagree, as this can sort out really quickly those cuckoos that you think are reasonable people and invest time and emotions into becoming friends with them. Then later you find that their views on certain important moral points is so far round the compass from you that you cannot believe that this person is the same person you really like and have a laugh with.

I don’t know if it’s been coming across in my writing so far but I’m left-leaning and atheist, neither of which precludes me from accepting and liking people who are not of that ilk.

Tolerance is a great virtue and I have friends of right political leaning and friends who are theists, but the one thing we do share is a respect for each other and a tolerance to accept other people’s beliefs, to a certain extent.

There are some views that are so radical I just cannot see how a person who believes those can be accepted as a functioning member of our society.

Racism, sexism, and any other form of outright bigotry, whether based on a religious or political belief is just wrong, very wrong and no written words can justify any person’s belief and practice in these areas. So if the discussion get’s around to that early you can ensure that you do not associate with bigots and such.

If left to a later date these revelations can really sour a person’s outlook on the human race as bigots are just like the rest of us; eat, love, sleep, work and make friends, so that bigot could be us.